Go F*ck, I mean, Find Yourself

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Glenn Lutz is more than an artist. He’s a survivor, an empath, a former Eagle Scout. His latest book, Go F*ck, I mean, Find Yourself is a straightforward, brutally honest self-help guide for those who need their wisdom with a little less Oprah, a little more Lutz. We talked to multi-talented outsider on his inspirations, work, and the use of profanity.

Tell Us more about being an interdisciplinary artist?

Being an interdisciplinary artist equates to freedom for me. As a child, I enjoyed expressing myself in television and theater, painting, playing piano, singing in concerts and writing poems. That passion still follows me as an adult, and limiting myself to one medium would feel constricting.

What is the meaning behind the title “Go F*ck, I mean, Find Yourself”?

The title stems from my battle with depression. I found that downward spirals were laced with inner dialogue that was negative and toxic, and the “you are not enoughs” and “maybe it’s time to give ups” were a figurative go fuck yourself. The quotes were tools I could use to create the me I desired to be.

Why the use of the profanity?

I don’t curse like a sailor in my private life, but I do tend to when making a point I’m passionate about. When I find myself in low moments, I employ my internal dialogue to serve as a drill sergeant, telling me things like “get the fuck up, you can do this,” or “don’t worry about the bullshit, keep it pushing.”

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What are the inspirations behind some of your quotes?

The quotes are inspired by the things I’ve read, from The Holy Bible to Eckhart Tolle. They’re affirmations, suggestions and questions I’ve utilized at various moments to keep pressing on. The quote “Stop trying to fuck with people who don’t fuck with you, and who you don’t even fuck with. Peep the vibes.” was the first quote I ever wrote. I had just went through a divorce and was reaching out to friends for support and everyone went ghost. I was in a place of neediness, and realized I needed to go within. I wrote it down as a reminder throughout the day, and later posted it on Instagram. After it was reposted by tons of people, I figured, maybe I should continue sharing these.

Earliest memory of creating something?

My earliest memory of creating something would be the paintings I would make as a young kid. I would draw these characters and write long back stories to accompany them. Sometimes they were superheroes, and sometimes they were villains. I’d list out their crimes or powers, favorite foods, and their childhood bios, aiming to make sense of why they would behave the way they did. I loved writing stories and creating universes for characters to live in.

How would you describe your work?

I would describe my work as contemplative. I’m always striving to better understand myself, and master the instrument of me. I tend to focus on relationships between identity and spirituality, with the ultimate goal of personal alchemy.

 Glenn Lutz. Photos: Keith Oshiro

Glenn Lutz. Photos: Keith Oshiro

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What influence, if any, do you think your upbringing has had on you as an artist?

I would say my childhood has a pretty big impact on my work now. I was exposed to a vast array of music that gave me a well of sounds to pull from as a musician. My parents listened to everything from Madonna to George Beverly Shea. I was brought up in a loving and supportive home, and I strive to lead with love in my life and work.

How has your work evolved since you first began creating?

We live in very divisive times, and I believe love and empathy are lacking in many of the conversations we’re having as a nation, and I believe it’s the ingredient needed in overcoming the issues we face as a human race. I want to be a part of promoting and living that.

My work has always been an honest reflection of myself at any given time, so it’s definitely evolved over the years. In my early twenties, I was very depressed and my work reflected that. I was an obese alcoholic, smoking a pack of cigarettes a day, creating almost entirely at night. The music and poetry I was writing at the time was something like a blend of Charles Bukowski and Yeezus.

Who or what inspires you?

I find inspiration in almost everything, but I feel the most inspired after meditation.

To Us, there is a “self-help guru” essence to your work. Is that accurate?

I think that’s fair, and that essence comes across with the book, but it wasn’t my intention. It really was a self-help book, in that I wrote the quotes to help myself. I don’t believe in telling anyone what to do, but I love sharing life experiences and my truth. If it helps someone, that’s a major plus. We live in very divisive times, and I believe love and empathy are lacking in many of the conversations we’re having as a nation, and I believe it’s the ingredient needed in overcoming the issues we face as a human race. I want to be a part of promoting and living that. Also, the subtitle of the book is “The Wisdom You Need To Get Off Your Ass and Create Your Best Self.” The first quote and last quote of the book is “You. The Answer Is You.” That was very intentional because ultimately, only you have the power to change yourself. Everyone has opinions and advice, but it’s every humans job to sift through that noise and take what works for them and apply it to their life.

What makes you most nostalgic?

Hiking always takes me back to my childhood. I’m an Eagle Scout and would hike with other teens, and go on backpacking trips with my dad. It always takes me back, and I feel most at peace when I’m in nature.

What do you hope to achieve through your work?

I want to inspire, and pose questions in my work that lead the introspection in the viewer. I want to create works that force people to be conscious of what they’re feeling and who they are. I want to bring people into the present.

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Favorite writer?

Tupac Shakur.

Favorite artists?

Jean Michel Basquiat, Marina Ambramovic, Chris Burden and Alejandro Jodorowsky.

Motto/quote you live by?

Keep fucking going.

Song that best describes you?

U2 – I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For.

Song of choice for your American road trip?

Sly & The Family Stone - Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Again).

Favorite thing about America?

Diversity.

What’s next?

I just released a mixtape titled LOUD ZOO and I’m currently working on new music that I’ll be releasing in the coming months. I’m also compiling and writing poems for an upcoming book, and I’m starring in a film that begins shooting in January of next year

Go F*ck, I mean, Find Yourself is available for purchase here. To find out more about Lutz and his mission visit glennlutz.com.

Words: Nikki Hall